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Can men get more time with their kids after divorce?

On Behalf of | May 12, 2022 | Custody And Parenting Time |

Some men do worry that they’ll lose time with their children because of a divorce. If they are the breadwinner, it may be hard for them to understand how they’ll have the time to see their children, especially if they were normally away during the day during the marriage.

That being said, you should know that you have a right to see your children after your divorce. As a father, your children rely on you to raise and support them, and you have a right to see them as much as possible.

Determining visitation

It’s helpful to think about the kind of visitation that could be right for you. For example, you may want to have custody of your children on the weekends, since you’ll have more time to focus on them. If you’re close to their school and can make your schedule flexible enough to accommodate getting home early, you could also adapt to being home throughout the week and having your children there with you.

Boosting your odds of getting the custody time you want

It’s important to know that you can boost the chances of getting custody and the schedule that you want. If your spouse is willing to negotiate on the terms of your parenting plan and custody agreement with you, you both should sit down and talk about your schedules and what would work best for you.

If your spouse does not want to communicate about the custody schedule or is unwilling to negotiate to make a schedule that works for you both, another thing to consider is going to court. It’s possible to litigate your case to have a judge help determine the best options for your children.

There are many options available to help you get time with your children. Do your best to remain respectful, have a good idea of the schedule you want to have and ask to negotiate. Being willing to work with the other parent could help you resolve any disputes sooner, and it looks great to the court if you eventually need to take this case to trial.

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